Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What can you tell us about the Clinic?

  2. When is the clinic open?

  3. What age does my child have to be to have the first vaccination?

  4. What can I do to make my child’s immunisation as painless as possible ?

  5. What order are the vaccines given in?

  6. Do the single vaccines contain mercury?

  7. Must my child have all three of the single vaccines?

  8. My child has started a course of single vaccinations elsewhere. Can they complete the course at the clinic?

  9. Can my child have the single vaccinations if they are due to have another vaccination around the same time?

  10. Can my child be vaccinated if they are ill?

  11. How long is the gap between each of the vaccinations?

  12. Where will my child be injected?

  13. Does the clinic offer 'immunity' blood tests?

  14. Can my child have the single vaccinations if they have a known allergy or are prone to allergic reactions?

  15. Will my child need a second course (boosters) of the single vaccinations?

  16. Who imports the vaccines and how are they transported?

  17. Where are the single vaccines manufactured?

  18. How are the vaccines stored?

  19. My child had the combined MMR and it is now time for their booster. Can they have the single vaccinations?

  20. What are the possible side effects/risks of the vaccinations?

  21. Is there any risk of infection to others from the vaccines?

  22. Patient Confidentiality

  23. ‘Unlicensed’ explained

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What can you tell us about the Clinic?

The Clinic was opened in 2003 and is now run by Dr Nick Arundale, a well known and respected GP who is a Partner at the Dolphins Medical Practice in Haywards Heath.

Dr Arundale carries out the consultations and administers the vaccines. Patients know that they will be treated professionally, honestly and safely.

Dr Arundale is a member of a medical defence union.

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When is the Clinic open?

Clinics are held on Saturdays, between the hours of 10.00am and 12.00pm.

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What age does my child have to be to have the first vaccination?

Measles vaccine is given from 12 months old.  There is no upper age limit.

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What can I do to make my child’s immunisation as painless as possible?

Nobody wants to give their child any pain but immunisations are one of the most effective ways of keeping well.

It is natural for children and sometimes parents to feel anxious so being prepared is helpful. The NHS gives some advice through this link:

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vaccinations/vaccination-appointment-tips-for-parents/

 

Perhaps watch with your child the Dr Ranj BBC videos on immunisation:

‘How do injections help you?’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ZTgsDsLIRE

 

‘Inject to Protect’       https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=astJFCImKQA

 

Here are some tips that I have found helpful over the years that the clinic has been running …

If you feel your child will understand, you can try explaining the reason to them why they are having a vaccination and that it helps them to remain healthy and strong.  Use words that are kind, such as ‘having some medicine in your arm to keep you well’, rather than using words like ‘shot, jab or needle’.  I usually say that ‘It will feel like a little pinch or scratch just for a moment and then it will go away’.

Emla cream (local anaesthetic) is available over the counter in pharmacies for you to purchase if desired.

I keep a small stock of stickers in my consulting room and if your child is particularly anxious, I ask them to choose a sticker during the consultation to have afterwards if they can sit still on the parents lap.

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What order are the vaccines given in?

We usually offer the vaccines in the order measles, rubella, and then mumps but can vaccinate your child in any order you choose, subject to vaccine availability. WE DO NOT HAVE STOCK OF MUMPS VACCINE.

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Do the single vaccines contain mercury?

None of the single vaccines used at the clinic contain mercury.

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Must my child have all three of the single vaccinations?

No, your child can have any combination of the vaccines. However it is recommended that your child is vaccinated against all three of the diseases and that the rubella and mumps vaccines are not omitted under the impression that they are not serious illnesses for boys and girls, respectively.

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My child has started a course of single vaccinations elsewhere. Can they complete the course at the clinic?

Yes.

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Can my child have the single vaccinations if they are due to have another vaccination around the same time?

Your child can be immunised at any interval before or after the single vaccinations, as long as the other vaccination is not a live viral vaccine.

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Can my child be vaccinated if they are ill?

Children can be vaccinated even when they have a cold and whilst taking most medicines, including antibiotics. However, they should not be vaccinated if they have a high temperature/fever or acute illness. Dr Arundale is happy to give advice if you are at all unsure.

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How long is the gap between each of the vaccinations?

The measles, mumps and rubella vaccines are live viral vaccines.  Live vaccines can be given simultaneously. However, if live vaccines are not administered at the same time then they should be separated by an interval of at least four weeks between each injection. This is a minimum interval; you can leave a longer gap between the vaccinations if you wish.

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Where will my child be injected?

Your child will normally be injected in the upper arm.

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Does the clinic offer ‘immunity’ blood tests?

We are unable to offer the blood test to check antibody levels. You can ask your GP, who may be able to arrange the test for you, though it is likely you will have to attend a larger private clinic.

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Can my child have the single vaccinations if they have a known allergy or are prone to allergic reactions?

Please let us know if your child has an allergy to eggs. We can obtain measles vaccine not grown on egg protein. Dr Arundale is happy to give advice in relation to any other allergies.

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Will my child need a second course (boosters) of the single vaccinations?

After the first course of vaccines a patient will usually be about 95% immune to the disease. A booster is recommended either as single vaccines or MMR.   Dr Arundale will be happy to discuss this with you.

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Who imports the vaccines and how are they transported?

The vaccines are procured by a company authorised to import unlicensed medicinal products into the UK. Their licence to import is granted by the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), a division of the Department of Health.

Vaccines are transported in temperature controlled conditions.

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Where are the single vaccines manufactured?

Our vaccines are produced by major vaccine manufacturers: Sanofi Pasteur in France and the Serum Institute of India.  Chickenpox vaccine is manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline in Belgium.  All three manufacturers have met stringent quality standards and been approved by the MHRA in the UK for supply of vaccines. 

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How are the vaccines stored?

Vaccines kept on the clinic premises are stored in a medical refrigerator in accordance to the manufacturer's instructions.

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My child had the combined MMR and it is now time for their booster.  Can they have the single vaccinations?

Yes, having the MMR does not stop your child from having the single vaccines the second time around.

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What are the possible side effects/risks of the vaccinations?

All vaccines have possible side effects. When vaccination takes place the body is tricked into thinking an infection has occurred. It then mounts an immune response to fight the infection. If the body has ever come across this particular virus before, it ‘remembers’ it, and starts making antibodies to fight the virus within 24 hours. This battle is often associated with a fever. If this is a new viral contact, the body may take from 10 to 14 days to produce these antibodies and fever can occur at this point in time. Therefore following a vaccination, fever can occur anytime between 24 hours and 14 days. This fever can easily and effectively be treated with paracetamol (Calpol) or ibuprofen in the usual way.

It is common to get some swelling and redness appearing at the injection site, which may get worse for up to 48 hours. Thereafter it should slowly subside.

Other possible side effects are general aches, rashes, runny nose or swollen glands. Again, these symptoms can occur anytime between 24 hours and 14 days after the injection.

We will give you a data sheet about the vaccine your child has had. This will tell you exactly where the vaccine comes from and what side effects you may expect.

If a child seems unusually unwell, stops drinking or is drowsy, medical advice should be sought immediately.

If you have any concerns that your child is unwell because of the vaccine please ring 07974 674582. Dr Arundale will ring you back as soon as possible.

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Is there any risk of infection to others from the vaccines?

Even though the vaccines are live, there is no risk of infection to others.

 

 

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Patient Confidentiality:

This clinic complies with the Data Protection Act 1998 and operates a patient confidentiality policy for all services provided. Under the Data Protection Act, you are entitled to access clinical records or any other personal information held about you. Personal and medical details will only be released to the patient, legal guardian, or others with the patient's written request.

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‘Unlicensed’ explained:

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) is the body responsible for issuing licences for the manufacture and sale of vaccines in the UK and also for issuing licences for the importation of vaccines into the UK.

The measles, mumps and rubella as single vaccines are unlicensed for manufacture and sale in the UK.

However, single vaccines are manufactured in other countries and are licensed to be imported into the UK by the MHRA. The manufacturer of these vaccines is responsible for their efficacy and safety under the Consumer Protection Act 1987, subject to them being stored and administered correctly.